This weekend I hit the streets of Accra to immerse myself in the explosion of creativity that is the annual Chale Wote Street Art Festival. The festival has been held every year since 2011 and is essentially an arts workshop that turns an entire street in Jamestown, Accra into an open-ended canvas for artists of all types to leave their mark on the city. And for a couple of days each year, that winding stretch of urban terrain truly feels as if it’s been reclaimed by “the people.”

This time I took the opportunity to do a bit of photojournalism and tried to capture some of the most interesting scenes I encountered. The quality and diversity of the art seems to keep getting better each year, and the vibe is always spontaneous and chilled out. It’s definitely one of the best ways to spend a Saturday afternoon in Accra. The Chale Wote Street Art Festival is organized by Accra [dot] Alt. You can find a lot more photos on their site, or simply by googling ‘Chale Wote.’

All of these photos were taken on a Nokia Lumia 520, which isn’t spectacular but still manages a decent job.

I just came across this remarkable African Sci-fi short film called ‘The Day They Came.’ It’s a zero budget 4-minute-long piece which follows a young Nigerian man who strolls outside his house on a calm Sunday morning only to witness the start of an alien invasion à la War of the Worlds. This is apparently the first of a series, and I’m excited to see the upcoming releases. I find particularly fascinating the film’s subversion of the traditional alien encounter set in London or New York and, as in the movie District 9 (2009), relocation to the more familiar geography of a contemporary African city. This short film represents yet another example of the effectiveness of science fiction as a narrative instrument for the next generation of African artists.

Check out the film:

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This task required us to program a robot to use a wavefront path planning algorithm to navigate a map with obstacles.